North African Lamb Stew Recipe North African Lamb Stew Recipe 6 5 ml (1 t) coriander seeds 5 ml (1 t) cumin seeds 5 ml (1 t) ground turmeric 2.5 ml (½ t) ground paprika salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 kg boned and cubed stewing lamb (shoulder, neck or similar) 45 ml (3 T) sunflower oil 1 brown onion, chopped 5 ml (1 t) crushed ginger 5 ml (1 t) crushed garlic 1 x 410 g can Chopped Peeled Tomatoes 3 – 5 green cardamom cloves, crushed 3 – 5 cloves 2 cinnamon sticks 125 – 250 ml (½ C – 1 C) water fresh coriander leaves

North African Lamb Stew

Wonderbag North African Lamb Stew www.pomegranatedays.co.za

My slow cooker died and I had never been happier.

I already had its replacement all picked out. The long held hope of owning a Wonderbag™ was circling that slow cooker’s last dismal attempt at preparing my dinner like a vulture over a dying ox. I dumped that poor thing in the recycling bin before it was properly cold and headed out to purchase a Wonderbag™; Eskom’s load shedding and the onset of Cape Winter my two loyal albeit unwanted accomplices.

If you have never heard of The Wonderbag™ and you are a fan of the slow cooked winter staples like stews, soups, pot roasts etc. then you are definitely missing out. The Wonderbag™ is the brain child of Sarah Collins, and while the “technology” of the bag is not new, the motivation behind it is.

Wonderbag North African Lamb Stew www.pomegranatedays.co.za
Wonderbag North African Lamb Stew www.pomegranatedays.co.za

Sarah developed the modern day version in 2008 as an answer to reduce the strain on women and children in rural areas to collect firewood and tend fires, sometimes all day, in an effort to cook a meal.

Says Sarah: “Finding firewood for cooking takes a huge amount of rural women’s time, and gathering it is very dangerous. The wood fires used to cook then cause indoor pollution, a leading cause of death worldwide in children under five. Having the Wonderbag™ would empower the women to feed their families, generate an income, and save them time.”

Besides the very welcome electricity saving aspect of this bag, one of my favourite things about buying a Wonderbag™ is that for every Wonderbag™ sold a portion of these proceeds goes towards donating a Wonderbag™, via the Wonderbag™ Foundation, to a family in need within a designated community in a developing country.

{You can read more on the Wonderbag™ website and you can also purchase a bag directly from the site. I nipped down to Outdoor Warehouse for mine.}

Wonderbag North African Lamb Stew www.pomegranatedays.co.za
Wonderbag North African Lamb Stew www.pomegranatedays.co.za

So, I had just skipped home with my brand new Wonderbag™ tucked under my arm – the bags are vacuum packed and only expand to full size once opened – when I met with Dear Husband the Skeptic. That man was really, really skeptical.

So skeptical was he in fact, that I was a bag of nerves (yeah, couldn’t resist that) by the time I had my stew ready to go in. Doubt had taken hold and I had visions of serving an undercooked stew. Fueling my ever growing doubt was the fact that whilst in use the Wonderbag™ did not even get warm on the outside nor was my dinner emitting its usual familiar aromas. I resigned myself to dinner being either a great success or a not so hot mess. To my delight, and Dear Husband’s surprise, the stew emerged some three hours later still hot, delicious and ready for the table.

Since then I have used my Wonderbag™ most confidently for the likes of a chicken pot roast and a beef mince ragout with equally pleasing results. The only problem I can forsee with this bag is the possibility of forgetting that you have put something in it. Look friends, I am over forty now, these things are bound to happen.

I have called this stew a North African Lamb Stew mainly because I love the spices peculiar to Morroccan-style cooking and any creativity for calling it something else simply escapes me today. This recipe is so wonderfully fragrant on both the nose and the tongue, that a simple side of Basmati rice is really all it needs.

Do you have a Wonderbag™? I absolutely insist that you tell me what you have made in it and send me to the best recipes you have found. This week I am trying the overnight oats. I also have plans to use it as a sort of proving drawer for my next batch of Cinnamon Buns. As soon as I figure out how to do that first, obviously.

Friends, this post is not sponsored. I bought my own Wonderbag™ and created this recipe for this blog simply because I think that when you find something that quickly becomes one of your favourite things, you should share it.

www.pomegranatedays.co.za Sam Taylor Food Blog

North African Lamb Stew
 
Author:
Serves: 6
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
 
North African Lamb Stew Serves 4-6
Ingredients
  • 5 ml (1 t) coriander seeds
  • 5 ml (1 t) cumin seeds
  • 5 ml (1 t) ground turmeric
  • 2.5 ml (½ t) ground paprika
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 kg boned and cubed stewing lamb (shoulder, neck or similar)
  • 45 ml (3 T) sunflower oil
  • 1 brown onion, chopped
  • 5 ml (1 t) crushed ginger
  • 5 ml (1 t) crushed garlic
  • 1 x 410 g can Chopped Peeled Tomatoes
  • 3 – 5 green cardamom cloves, crushed
  • 3 – 5 cloves
  • 2 cinnamon stick
  • 125 – 250 ml (½ C – 1 C) water
  • fresh coriander leaves
Instructions
  1. Place the coriander seeds and cumin seeds in a dry frying pan. Toast over high heat until fragrant and then transfer to a mortar and pestle. Crush to fine and transfer to a bowl.
  2. Add the ground turmeric, paprika, salt and pepper and toss well to mix all the spices.
  3. Add the lamb to the bowl and stir well until the lamb is coated in the spices.
  4. Leave to stand for 30 minutes.
  5. Heat the oil in a large saucepan.
  6. Add the lamb in batches and brown the pieces on all sides. Set aside.
  7. Add the onion to the same saucepan and fry until the onions is softened. Add the ginger and the garlic and fry for a few minutes more.
  8. Return the meat to the saucepan and stir to mix well.
  9. Add the tomatoes.
  10. Add the cardamom, cloves and cinnamon sticks.
  11. Bring the stew to the boil.
  12. Place the boiling stew into the Wonderbag as per instructions.
  13. Close the bag and leave to slow cook for 3-4 hours or until the meat is tender.
  14. Alternatively, braise the meat in a low oven (150 deg) for 3 -4 hours until the meat is tender./
  15. Alternatively, move the casserole to a slow cooker and cook until the meat is tender.

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11 Comments on North African Lamb Stew

  1. Annalise
    July 3, 2015 at 1:46 pm (2 years ago)

    Thanks Sam for sharing the Wonderbag with us – such a lovely idea! Cannot wait to try out the stew!

    Reply
    • sam
      July 4, 2015 at 3:44 pm (2 years ago)

      Thanks A! PS This would have made an excellent birthday gift! Next time.

      Reply
  2. Anna
    August 3, 2015 at 9:40 am (2 years ago)

    Always enjoy your blog, thanks! Was wondering if you could share who you did your pinterest course through and if they offer other social media training?
    thanks!

    Reply
    • sam
      August 3, 2015 at 9:56 am (2 years ago)

      Hi Anna. Thanks for stopping in. I am going to email you the details. Love, Sam

      Reply
  3. Zwe
    October 5, 2015 at 1:35 pm (2 years ago)

    Hi Sam maybe it eluded me what is the next step after you have brought your stew to the boil?

    Reply
    • sam
      October 6, 2015 at 11:44 am (2 years ago)

      Hi Zwe. Thank you for stopping by. I apologise if I did not make the instructions on using the WonderBag clear enough in the recipe. I have updated the recipe now and hope that it reflects the next steps more accurately. Regards Sam.

      Reply
  4. Zwe
    October 24, 2015 at 11:15 am (2 years ago)

    Hi Sam thank you so much

    Reply
  5. Lee
    July 29, 2016 at 1:05 pm (1 year ago)

    Thanks Sam, I am so making your north African lamb stew this weekend. Pray for cold rainy weather😊

    Reply
    • sam
      July 29, 2016 at 4:54 pm (1 year ago)

      Great Lee. I hope it turns out fabulous whatever the weather 🙂

      Reply
  6. Caroline Lucas
    September 7, 2016 at 6:01 pm (12 months ago)

    Hi Sam
    I am so excited to try this recipe!!
    We have a bush camp (no electricity) and all our food is cooked over the open fire (bobotie, potjie, braai) and we use the Wonderbag to do the rice … I have been looking for a meal to add to our (very tiny) repertoire and didn’t want another potjie – THIS looks too divine! Trying it this weekend – can’t wait.
    (I LOVE our Wonderbag – and I don’t work for them either 🙂 )
    Thanks so much
    Love Caroline

    Reply
    • sam
      September 9, 2016 at 11:35 am (12 months ago)

      Hi Caroline. In my early chef days I worked on a bush camp, so know full well the limitations it places on how you cook. This recipe is a favourite in our house, I hope you have great success. Sam.

      Reply

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